Difference between revisions of "Heraldic Mantle of Giles Hill"

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{{regalia|photo=[[Image:Giles HeraldicMantle.jpg|300px]]|photocaption=Heraldic Cape of Giles Hill |status=Active|artists=[[Giles Hill]], [[Giuseppe_Francesco_da_Borgia|Giuseppe Franchesco da Borgia]], [[Richenda_Elizabeth_Coffin|Richenda Elizabeth Coffin]] }}
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{{regalia|photo=[[Image:Giles HeraldicMantle.jpg|300px]]|photocaption=Heraldic Cape of Giles Hill |status=Active|artists=[[Giles Hill]], [[Giuseppe_Francesco_da_Borgia|Giuseppe Franchesco da Borgia]], [[Richenda_Elizabeth_Coffin|Richenda Elizabeth Coffin]]}}
  
  
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Image:Giles_GermanMantle2.JPG|Konrad Grunenberg's Roll of 1483.
 
Image:Giles_GermanMantle2.JPG|Konrad Grunenberg's Roll of 1483.
 
Image:Giles_EnglishMantle.jpg|Julian Wilson heralds a Pas d'Arms at the Ancient Hospital and Almshouse of St. Cross, in Drachanwald, near West Dragonshire (Southern England excepting London).  The devices on the tabard are those of Seigneurial families of Jersey in the late 15th C, courtesy of the Librarian of our local historical Socièté Jersaise.
 
Image:Giles_EnglishMantle.jpg|Julian Wilson heralds a Pas d'Arms at the Ancient Hospital and Almshouse of St. Cross, in Drachanwald, near West Dragonshire (Southern England excepting London).  The devices on the tabard are those of Seigneurial families of Jersey in the late 15th C, courtesy of the Librarian of our local historical Socièté Jersaise.
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Image:BrianOhUilliamHeraldTabard.jpg|Brian O'hUilliam, Bordure Herald of Ansteorra, wearing his "resume" tabard.
 
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Latest revision as of 14:43, 28 June 2020

Regalia
Giles HeraldicMantle.jpg
Heraldic Cape of Giles Hill
Information
Status: Active
Artist(s): {{{artist}}}



Freelance Heralds

Medieval heralds generally worked for a single patron (which could be a monarch or other noble personage, or an Order of chivalry). When speaking for the principal, the herald would wear a tabard bearing the arms of their patron, symbolizing the fact that the herald spoke not on their own behalf, but with the voice of their liege. Some heralds, however, were available to be hired to speak for anyone needing their services, and made this known by wearing mantles bearing the arms of their various employers.

The Society's heralds typically wear a tabard displaying the arms of the territory they serve. Occasionally a tabard bearing personal arms will be seen; this may be in tournaments of great pageantry, like Crown Tournies or pas d'armes, or a court ceremony like a coronation or elevation to the peerage. But given the expense of creating a heraldic tabard, not only in materials, but in the artisan's labor, personal heraldic tabards (distinct from armorial surcotes or other garments which bear the arms of the wearer) are quite unusual.

Dr Lynsey Darby, a former Archivist of the College of Heralds in London, reveals that Randolf Jackson, appointed Montorgeuil poursuivant by Henry VII in early 1486, provided heraldic services for the 135 Seigneurial families of Jersey. The Governor of Jersey, Matthew Baker, presented an expense claim[1] for a Tabard provided for Montorgeuil, "broidered with the devices of many Houses"[2]

Construction of the Mantle

The mantle is in the form of a three-quarter circle Elizabethan fingertip cape, circa 1580. It is made of black silk velvet, trimmed with gold bullion gimp, and ornamented with heraldic badges and the arms of the territories and peers Giles has served as herald.

Territorial Arms and Badges on the Mantle

Personal Arms on the Mantle

It was the custom of the European Middle Ages to pay heralds. A fine custom, sadly fallen into disuse during these current, degenerate times. Giles charges each peer one embroidered badge of their arms in recompense for his service in their elevation ceremony. The (approximate) finished dimensions are 4" tall, 3.5" wide. They are canvaswork (also called tentwork and needlepoint) worked on 18 - 22 count needlepoint canvas, in cotton, linen, or silk.

Arms worked, but not yet added

These slips have been completed, and are waiting to be added to the mantle.

slips not yet received

These spaces are reserved for the slips which have not yet been paid.

  1. The claim is preserved in the National Archives at Kew, and partly re-printed in the Rolls Series No24 and also cited in ms ‘38 B.18 p. 97’ by John Anstis, Garter KoA.
  2. I am indebted to Julian Wilson, on the FaceBook SCA Heraldry Unofficial Chat, for this information.